Cloud Atlas

Chocolates !!!

“Life is like a box of chocolates.  You never know what you’re gonna get.”
(Tom Hanks in Forrest Gump)

box of choclate

I was watching the movie “Cloud Atlas.”  It’s a strange, unusual movie I think.  It was difficult to patch the six-ages stories together so I started over from the beginning to get a foot hold on the events.  The first scene opens with Zachary (Tom Hanks), as an old man.  As he is thinking aloud I felt an image bubble up from my subconscious.  I saw us as chocolates in a box.  With each succeeding box we never knew who we were choosing to be.

It is a subconscious metaphor.  That happens once in a while when I am in a particular state of mind:   relaxed, intrigued, curious, mentally free but striving to understand.  As I listened to Zachary’s monologue that is a review of his present life, I thought of my friend who wants to die and whose family is angrily struggling to keep her alive.  She has been telling me about her method of slow suicide which she hopes will go undetected by her family and doctors.  In the middle of this reverie I saw the chocolates.  I wondered about the connection.  Then I felt it – our unawareness of truth most of the time – what Zachary calls “The True True”.  We think this box we fill is all there is.  We don’t see beyond it into the distant future and then beyond that.  We don’t reverie about the distant past and beyond that.  We think, and believe, that this life’s pains and joys are the true-true.

Zachary, year 2350

Zachary, year 2350

But when I had a glimpse of the box with its chocolates I feel the surreality of life on this planet.  We come here, we leave here, we come here, we leave here.  It was an ingenious idea to use the same actors playing people who interconnect with each other in each new age.   The heavily scarred Zachary feels an excruciating pain when he witnesses, some years before, the violent deaths of his brother-in-law and nephew, but we have seen him before over and over like God sees us.  And we know that his life is not what it seems to him.

The chocolates will be eaten.  Then a new box will appear with new chocolates.  For a moment I was looking down on this box from above as I imagine God and the angels do.  This ‘knowing’, as my sister-in-law describes it, benefits me when I get caught up in a thinking that is a believing that this time is all there is and every choice matters and every outcome matters.  I have difficulty with making decisions because of my upbringing where any mistake was met with derision and drama.  I have difficulty letting go of things that I feel I cannot live without.  But this is a fog that I create because of my belief that my place in this box — that is my present life — is all there is.  In a way, each decision and outcome do matter but only to the extent that they walk out of the past and travel into any of an infinite number of futures which I will eventually be a part of again.

If you have read any of my earlier weblogs you know that I feel a special connection to the Universe.  So as I was writing this I received a phone call from my brother’s wife.  We rarely talk (though we enjoy it when we do) but only because neither of us reaches out very often.  So as I am in this surreal place the Universe has nudged her to call me to work out a problem she was having with my brother and their oldest daughter.  We talked for hours – it takes us a long time to run out of things to say and an ear to listen.  The topic was exactly what I had received from the movie.    We talked about conscious and subconscious motivations, family history, emotional and relational difficulties, and trying to make the present make sense and secure a good future.

And none of this would have happened as it did if I had not woken up with a pain in my knee that was causing me to lay in bed with my leg on a pillow and watching this movie, Cloud Atlas.

There are forces at work that we cannot perceive because we cannot help but limit ourselves mentally and emotionally to our box.

jackie

ps:  it is now August 21, 2013, and I am happy to say that my friend has given up her suicide attempt.

Mark Steyn’s essay on gay marriage makes me rethink my position

Mark Steyn, syndiciated columnist

Mark Steyn,
syndicated columnist

Syndicated columnist Mark Steyn wrote an essay on gay marriage which added an important element to my view on the subject.   I sent the following letter to the editor of my local paper, the Orange County  Register, in response.  My basic premise is that technology, while making life easier, is also removing the human element from our culture.

Letter to the Editor OC Register  4/1/13

Re Mark Steyn’s essay of 3/31/13 “Downward mobility in the age of fairness”

Mr Steyn makes a lot of sense in his well-written (would that I could write so  interestingly) essay.   Marriage has become a side dish in American culture which marches relentlessly into the technological fog while shedding one by one the organic organs that make it human, marriage being one of these.  I don’t know what this country will look like in the next few generations with Microsoft and Apple in the driver’s seat.  How do I connect these two behemoths with the institution of marriage?  I’m not too sure exactly except that technology, which is inevitable, has taken over and the sacred relationship: marriage,  is drowning in its wake.  Technology is creating a mad scramble for the “machine” that will solve all our problems and marriage has become a problem.  So why not change its parameters?  Expand its scope and meaning.  Move from the pen to the keyboard.   Make marriage an “unproblem” by fitting it into the vast motherboard of ons and offs, ones and zeros.  Take out the sacred to make it fit.  Take it down a notch or two, or ten.

Mr Steyn changed my mind today.  Until I read his essay I thought:  “Why not include gays?  Don’t they have the same rights as heteros?”  The answer is of course they do.  But are their unions sacred?  Do they further or retard cultural humanity?  There is no way to stop what is happening.  The Supreme court will not and cannot stop what is happening.  Just as divorce has become common place, so will gay marriage.  The sacred will lose the war with its enemy technology.  And what makes people human is dying with it.

Jacqueline:

This boy is amazing.  Watch the video and see for yourself what one person can do with a single idea.

Originally posted on The Seeker:

A homeless 13-year-old Filipino won a very prestigious award for his commitment to improving the lives of fellow street kids. Cris “Kesz” Valdez, who lived off a trash dump and slept in an open tomb for the majority of his childhood, was awarded last year’s International Children’s Peace Prize in The Hague on September 19, 2012. 
And this is his story: 
 
Gifts of Hope
For his seventh birthday, Kesz didn’t want any presents for himself. Instead, he wanted to give something to other street children: Gifts of Hope. That same year, Kesz started his own organization, Championing Community Children, aimed at giving street children hope and showing them that they can take their future into their own hands. Every week, he and his friends go to underprivileged communities to teach children about hygiene, food and children’s rights. He even takes things a step further, by teaching children…

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